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First Look to Samsung’s Un-Samsung Approach With Galaxy S5: No Ultra HD Display, No Retina Scanner

Wearable Computing Conference 2014

Wearable Computing Conference 2014

WSJ’s Joanna Stern seems surprised by not seeing an eye-popping Ultra HD display? No retina scanner? But the rumors suggested the Galaxy S5 was going to be a life-changing phone, she complains.

No, the Galaxy S5, unveiled in Barcelona Monday, isn’t chock full of radical new hardware components or fancy-sounding software features, which require you to hold one arm over your head and tilt the phone towards the equator to work properly.

The Galaxy S5 feels different for Samsung. Literally, she concludes.

Instead of the slimy, glossy plastic rear cover that has plagued previous Galaxy S generation, the fifth edition has a higher quality matte plastic adorned with what can best be described as inverted braille dots. It feels nicer than previous models, though it’s still not as good looking or feeling as the iPhone 5S or the various flavors of Moto X. The GS5’s black, blue and white versions are much more handsome than the gaudy gold, which we all agree looks a lot like a Band-Aid.

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What Steve Job’s response to Google Glass would be: Icis, a classier, sexier and more human-friendly new nose-perched wearable device

Icis: It's like Google Glass, but classy

Icis: It’s like Google Glass, but classy

Laforge Optical CEO and Founder Corey Mack is taking on Google’s famed Glass at one of its more vulnerable pressure points: the embarrassment factor. CNET’s Chris Matyszczyk presents Laforge’s Icis as Google Glass for real human beings. “You know, the ones who bathe in the power of the superficial, as well as the serious,” he says.

“Mack makes lofty, as well as stylish, claims. He says his company has ‘figured out how to give you augmented reality capabilities within a conventional-looking pair of eyeglasses for people regardless of their prescription.’ You might wonder who are these clever people at Laforge. Well, they’re current and former alumni of Rochester Institute of Technology. Mack himself came out of RIT’s mechanical engineering technology program. His undergraduate thesis focused on disaster relief housing and alternative fuel vehicles. Perhaps there’s more money in technological fashion.”

Mack is quoted sustaining a different approach about the snoop factor: “There is no light that comes on with these when you are being filmed. We felt that a light would be overkill and that people would think that they would be getting scanned. Additionally, if I were in a crowded bar or walking down the street I wouldn’t know how many cell phone cameras and police cameras were looking at me anyway. I like to look at the upsides of having a camera like this on board. Think of how many people who were wrongly convicted of crimes would not be in jail right now or how much more abuse of police power would be exposed.”

Matyszczyk admits there’s a certain intelligence in Laforge’s basic approach to design. As he explained: “We design products for people, not in spite of people.”

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Latest about Google Glass and Wearable Technologies at Wearable Computing Conference 2014 San Francisco, New York, London, Seoul and Munich

Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com) global: New York City, San Francisco, London, Seoul and Munich, “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion.”

Wearable Computing Conference 2014

According to a report by CNN, Patrick Jackson has developed an app for Google Glass, Google’s experimental head-mounted computer, which feeds important information directly to the eye-line of firefighters in an emergency. When a building is on fire, every second counts for the first responders rushing to the scene. This computer-savvy firefighter in North Carolina is hoping a bit of futuristic wearable technology and clever programming can help save time and lives, themes that will be covered at Golden Networking‘s Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com), “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion”, forums to be held throughout 2014 in San Francisco (March 18), London (May 29), New York City (July 31), Seoul (September 25) and Munich (November 20).

A self-taught programmer, Jackson first started tinkering with computers when he was 7 and later spent a year studying computer science in college before transferring to the University of North Carolina, Asheville, for an environmental management and policy program. He became a firefighter. About four years ago, he purchased a smartphone and was inspired to start programming again. “Since then I’ve taught myself way more than I ever knew about programming. I’ve developed an Android app, an iPhone app and a Glass app,” Jackson said.

His first project was the Android app Firefighter Log, which routed key information directly to the smartphone, including text messages from dispatchers, streams of emergency radio feeds, and location information for fires and nearby hydrants. Jackson says more than 20,000 people have downloaded the apps. To get his hands on Google Glass, Jackson submitted his idea to Google’s IfIHadGlass competition.

By routing information directly to Google Glass, the app can save firefighters from having to stop what they’re doing in order to reach for a radio, smartphone, tablet or computer. Jackson plans on adding even more useful data in future versions, like information on specific buildings including blueprints, potential building hazards and contact information for owners. A firefighter might be able to say an address out loud or simply look at a building with the Google Glass camera to retrieve information.

Google Glass can also record the first video of a situation when crews arrive. That early documentation will be important to fire investigations down the line. For now, Google Glass isn’t compatible with the oxygen masks firefighters wear on the ground, so the app is more for external personnel. Jackson’s Glass stays behind in the truck.

Other fire departments and researchers also are experimenting with wearable technology, thanks to a recent availability of affordable wearable sensors that can track vitals and environmental factors like air quality and temperature. The Wearable Advanced Sensor Platform, or WASP, can track a firefighter’s location as well as physical data such as heart rate, breathing and activity levels in real time. A Belgium finalist for Microsoft’s Imagine Cup created a system that combines location sensors and augmented reality glasses to help firefighters move around buildings when there is minimal visibility.

Golden Networking‘s Wearable Computing Conference 2014, “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion,” will examine wearable technologies’ functions, application, the competition and possibilities for economic and personal growth in San Francisco, London, New York City, Seoul and Munich.

Wearable Computing Conference 2014 is produced by Golden Networking (http://www.goldennetworking.net), the premier networking community for business and technology executives, entrepreneurs and investors. Panelists, speakers and sponsors are invited to contact Golden Networking by sending an email to information@goldennetworking.com.

New York City is Today World’s Wearable Tech Capital with Wearable Computing Conference 2014

Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com) global: New York City, San Francisco, London, Seoul and Munich, “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion.”

Wearable Computing Conference 2014

Building off of the momentum of past successful conferences, Golden Networking takes Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com) global: New York City, San Francisco, London, Seoul and Munich, “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion.” Today is New York City’s turn to examine wearable technologies’ functions, application, the competition and possibilities for economic and personal growth. If the agenda (below) is any indication, hundreds of members of the wearable technology community are in for a real treat:

Motion Stabilization using Wearable Technology
Aditya Bansal, Technical Co-Founder, Weartrons Labs
Praveen Elak, Business Co-Founder, Weartrons Labs

The Wearable Technologies Landscape
Edgar Perez, Editor, Wearable Computing Review

Wearable Media: Predictions on The Future of Social
Jennifer Levine, Founder, Fanoptic

My Experience with Google Glass
Cecilia Abadie, Founder, 33Labs

Designing Native Apps for Google Glass and Other Wearables
Yosun Chang, Founder and CTO, AReality3D

The Future of Wearable Computing Today
Carol Pinchefsky, Writer, Smartbear.com

Wearable Computing Conference 2014 is produced by Golden Networking (http://www.goldennetworking.net), the premier networking community for business and technology executives, entrepreneurs and investors. Panelists, speakers and sponsors are invited to contact Golden Networking by sending an email to information@goldennetworking.com.

CIO: 5 Things You Need to Know About Google Glass

 

Google Glass

Google Glass

The idea was to demonstrate one potential use of Glass: To show the Glass-wearers’ view of thrilling events, like skydiving, scaling down buildings or BMX bicycling.

I’ve thought a lot about Google Glass since then and wrote about it on a few occasions. I have mostly poked fun at the awkward-looking gadget and its wearers. But the fact of the matter is that Google Glass likely marks an important milestone in the evolution of personal electronics. And even though Glass makes its wearers look foolish – except, of course, me; I make Glass look gooood – you’re going to hear a lot about in the coming years.

Earlier this month, I attended Google I/O again, and this time around I actually got to spend some time with Glass. To be honest, I didn’t really even understand what Google Glass was before I/O 2013; I thought it was just a weird-looking camera mounted on some glasses frames. It is. But Glass is also much more. Here are five things that anyone interested in Google Glass need to know.

Google Glass is Not Just a Wearable Camera

Glass lets you take first-person images and video clips that can be streamed to friends in real time, but it’s much more than just a camera attached to some glasses. It’s a tiny computer attached to the side of the frames with a small display the user can see and a camera lens positioned to capture exactly what the Glass wearer sees. Glass runs a version of Google’s Android OS. And as such, it can run applications and access Google services including search. So you can ask Glass for answers to questions and quickly receive relevant information, among other things, without using your hands. (Check out this list of cool Glass apps.)

 

Google Glass Models

 

Glass is also designed to provide information before users ask for it. So, for example, directions to a nearby restaurant you researched in the past may pop up on your Glass screen when you walk within a certain distance of an eatery. (These features appear to be an extension of Android’s existing Google Now functionality, which studies user behavior and provides information and answers to questions before users know that they need them.)

Glass is still in its infancy, and the future of Glass apps largely depends on developers. But if interest at the 2013 I/O developer conference is any indication, Glass users should have access to a wide range of software, including ports of popular smartphone apps.

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Bloomberg: Samsung’s Wearable Smartwatch Tries to Hitch a Ride With BMW’s Monitor Technology

According to Bloomberg, despite an endless barrage of commercials, the Galaxy Gear smartwatch hasn’t been a big hit for Samsung Electronics. But the South Korean company has high hopes for a new app that lets BMW owners monitor their beloved cars’ vital signs on their wristwatches.

Bloomberg: Samsung's Wearable Smartwatch Tries to Hitch a Ride With BMW's Monitor Technology

Samsung’s Smartwatch (David Becker/Getty Images)

Samsung introduced the BMW app for the Gear last week at the International Consumer Electronics Show. You couldn’t miss it. Among the televisions, cameras, tablets and dishwashers in Samsung’s largest-ever booth inside the Las Vegas Convention Center, a BMW i3 electric car was stationed in one corner.

Samsung’s Smartwatch will be one of hot wearable devices to be discussed at Golden Networking‘s Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com), “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion”, forums to be held throughout 2014 in New York City (January 30), San Francisco (March 18), London (May 29), Seoul (September 25) and Munich (November 20).

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The Huffington Post: Cecilia Abadie, California Motorist, Cleared In Google Glass Speeding Ticket Case

Cecilia Abadie at Golden Networking's Wearable Computing Conference 2014

Cecilia Abadie at Golden Networking’s Wearable Computing Conference 2014

According to The Huffington Post, a San Diego traffic court threw out a citation Thursday against a woman who authorities said was driving while wearing the Google Glass computer-in-eyeglass device. Commissioner John Blair ruled that Cecilia Abadie was not guilty because the code she was cited for requires proof that the device was in operation. Blair found there was no proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

Abadie is believed to be the first motorist cited for wearing Google Glass while driving. She was also found not guilty of speeding. Abadie, a software developer, is among some 30,000 people called “explorers” who have been selected to try out Google Glass before the technology becomes widely available to the public later this year. The device on a kind of glass-wear frame features a thumbnail-size transparent display above the right eye.

Abadie was pulled over in October on a San Diego freeway. The California Highway Patrol officer saw she was wearing Google Glass and tacked on a citation usually given to people driving while a video or TV screen is on in the front of their vehicle. Abadie had pleaded not guilty to both charges in San Diego traffic court. Her attorney William Concidine previously said the device was not activated when she was driving.

Abadie, founder of 33Labs, will address hundreds of attendees to Golden Networking‘s Wearable Computing Conference 2014 (http://www.wearable-computing-conference.com), “How Wearable Technologies are Revolutionizing Mobile Wireless Internet, Healthcare and Fashion”, forums to be held throughout 2014 in New York City (January 30), San Francisco (March 18), London (May 29), Seoul (September 25) and Munich (November 20).

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