Wearable and Cyber Computing Report

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CIO: Is Google Glass a Gimmick or an IT Revolution?

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Mobile device management (MDM) specialist Fiberlink is one of them. The company sees myriad use cases for hands-free, wearable computing, and is in the process of adding Google Glass to its portfolio of supported devices. Coinciding with this year’s Google I/O, the company announced that its MaaS360 platform supports the capability to use Glass to monitor a mobile IT environment and perform actions like locating a lost device, remotely locking or unlocking it, even perform selective or full wipes of data.

[Slideshow: 15 Cool Apps for Google Glass ]

“One of the very first reasons we are jumping into the Google Glass area is that our customers rely on us to manage all devices,” says Jim Szafranski, senior vice president of Customer Platform Services at Fiberlink. “We’ve always been the leader in being first and fastest in this area of mobility.”

But there’s more to Fiberlink’s decision to support Glass than being a completist in its offerings, Szafranski says. He sees Glass, or similar forms of wearable computing, as playing an increasing role in the enterprise in time.

“Even though we’re in the beginning days, we’ve got a lot of field applications that our customers are interested in,” he says. “Right now, we’ve got guys climbing telephone poles holding tablets.”

Google Glass

Thumbs Up on Hands-Free IT

It’s easy to imagine scenarios where hands-free computing could revolutionize certain vertical industries, Szafranski adds. For instance, in healthcare doctors and nurses could use the technology to access information about patients while traveling from one to the other, or to scan a prescription to pull up all relevant information about a drug and its interactions. In warehouses, Glass could replace scanner guns and provide the ability to locate stock simply by glancing around the warehouse. Public sector workers like police officers and fire fighters could also benefit from hands-free computing.

The case for hands-free computing isn’t quite so clear in Fiberlink’s first foray into supporting Glass: It’s an IT administration app that allows users to monitor a mobile IT environment and take actions like locking, unlocking, locating or remote wiping managed devices using Glass’s voice commands or hand gestures.

“This is the first step,” Szafranski says. “For us, this was basically the first step in helping businesses realize the potential of wearable computing.”

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